-->

Chrystul Kizer makes appearance in Kenosha court for status conference | Crime & Courts

The woman facing a 2018 homicide charge for the death of a Kenosha man being investigated for sex trafficking was back in a Kenosha County courtroom Friday.

Chrystul Kizer, of Milwaukee, faces first-degree intentional homicide for the June 2018 death of Randall Volar, a 34-year-old Kenosha man who prosecutors admit had been preying on Kizer and other underage girls.

Kizer, now 22, was 17 at the time she was charged and is accused of shooting Volar in the head and then setting his house on fire.

Kizer appeared briefly with attorneys Greg Holdahl, Helmi Hamad and Jennifer Bias before Judge David Wilk on Friday. District Attorney Michael Graveley and assistant district attorney Zachary Brost appeared on behalf of the state.

Both parties requested an evidentiary motion hearing, which is scheduled for January.

People are also reading…

Earlier this year the Supreme Court of Wisconsin ruled in favor of Kizer so she will be able to use “an affirmative defense for any offense committed as a direct result” of having been trafficked at her upcoming trial.

As the Supreme Court’s majority decision, penned by Justice Rebecca Dallet, noted: “Unlike many crimes which occur at discrete points in time, human trafficking can trap victims in a cycle of seemingly inescapable abuse that can continue for months or even years. For that reason, even an offense that is unforeseeable or that does not occur immediately after a trafficking offense is committed can be a direct result of the trafficking offense, so long as there is still the necessary logical connection between the offense and the trafficking.”

At question is a lack of clarity in state law.

Under a state law passed in 2008, victims of sex trafficking are immune from prosecution from crimes they themselves may have “committed as a direct result” of having been trafficked.

The decision does not protect someone who has been a victim of trafficking from all prosecution.

As Dallet wrote in the majority opinion: “It is not enough to say simply that because the defendant is a victim of human trafficking, any offense they commit subsequently must be a direct result of the trafficking. The offense must bear a logical, causal connection to the underlying trafficking offense; it must be a direct result of the trafficking. Thus, our interpretation does not create … blanket immunity for victims of human trafficking.”

The Kenosha County District Attorney’s Office argued this protection cannot be stretched to include a defense against killing the traffickers themselves, while those defending Kizer say it can be because the laws on the books have no restrictions on what crimes can be included.

IN PHOTOS: Chrystul Kizer makes court appearance in June 2021

Kizer Court

Chrystul Kizer waits to appear in Kenosha County Circuit Court Friday for a status hearing. Kizer was 17 when she was charged in June 2018 with with first-degree intentional homicide, arson and auto theft. She allegedly shot and killed Randall Volar III, 34, before setting his Kenosha home on fire and fleeing in his car. Volar would likely have been charged in connection with filming sex with underage girls — including Kizer — on the day she killed him, according to police.


Mark Hertzberg. for the Kenosha News

Kizer Court

Kizer Court

Kizer


Mark Hertzberg

Kizer Court

Kizer Court

Chrystul Kizer speaks with Public Defender Jennifer Bias after her status hearing in Kenosha County Circuit Court Friday.


mark

Hertzberg,

For the

Kenosha News


Kizer Court

Kizer Court

Chrystul Kizer waits to appear in Kenosha County Circuit Court Friday for a status hearing. Kizer was 17 when she was charged in June 2018 with with first-degree intentional homicide, arson and auto theft. She allegedly shot and killed Randall Volar III, 34, before setting his Kenosha home on fire and fleeing in his car.


Mark Hertzberg, for the Kenosha News

Kizer Court

Kizer Court

Chrystul Kizer, second from left, appears in Kenosha County Circuit Court Friday, June 25, 2021, for a status hearing. She is flanked by defense attorneys Jennifer Bias and Gregory Holdahl. District Attorney Michael Graveley and Assistant District Attorney Zachery Brost are shown at right at the prosecution’s table. Volar’s father, Randall, is right in the gallery. Kizer was 17 when she was charged in June 2018 with with first-degree intentional homicide, arson and auto theft. She allegedly shot and killed Randall Volar III, 34, before setting his Kenosha home on fire and fleeing in his car.


Mark Hertzberg, for the Kenosha News

Kizer Court

Kizer Court

Judge David P. Wilk presides as Chrystul Kizer appears in Kenosha County Circuit Court Friday for a status hearing.


Mark Hertzberg, For The Kenosha News

Kizer Court

Kizer Court

Randall Volar, Randall Volar III’s father, listens to proceedings as Chrystul Kizer appears in Kenosha County Circuit Court Friday for a status hearing.


Mark Hertzberg, For the Kenosha News

Kizer Court

Kizer Court

Chrystul Kizer walks past District Attorney Michael Graveley in Kenosha County Circuit Court Friday June 25, 2021, before her status hearing. Kizer was 17 when she was charged in June 2018 with with first-degree intentional homicide, arson and auto theft. She allegedly shot and killed Randall Volar III, 34, before setting his Kenosha home on fire and fleeing in his car.


KENOSHA NEWS FILE PHOTO

Kizer Court

Kizer Court

Randall Volar, Randall Volar III’s father, center, his mother, left, and Randall Volar Sr.’s wife Debbie Volar, right, listen to proceedings as Chrystul Kizer appears in Kenosha County Circuit Court Friday June 25, 2021 for a status hearing.


Mark Hertzberg

Kizer Court

Kizer Court

District Attorney Michael Graveley says that the state will appeal a recent decision in the case of Chrystul Kizer as she appears in Kenosha County Circuit Court Friday June 25, 2021 for a status hearing. Kizer was 17 when she was charged in June 2018 with with first-degree intentional homicide, arson and auto theft. She allegedly shot and killed Randall Volar III, 34, before setting his Kenosha home on fire and fleeing in his car. Volar would likely have been charged in connection with filming sex with underage girls — including Kizer — on the day she killed him, according to police. A recent appellate court ruling found that she may be able to use an affirmative defense open to sex trafficking victims arguing that her actions were directly related to being a victim. District Attorney Michael Graveley said in curt that the state plans to appeal that decision to the Wisconsin Supreme Court. Another status conference was set for October 29. Jailed for two years, Kizer was released on a $400,000 bond posted by the Chicago Community Bond Fund with support of the Chrystul Kizer Defense Committee. Kizer, whose case has drawn national attention, has written Judge Wilk that she is willing to take a plea deal to plead guilty to felony murder and bail jumping, with a maximum prison sentence of 15 years. a conviction of first-degree homicide could mean a life sentence in prison. Nearly 1.5 million people have signed an online petition calling for charges against her to be dropped. / Mark Hertzberg for The Kenosha News


Mark Hertzberg, for The Kenosha News

Kizer Court

Kizer Court

Chrystul Kizer, left, appears in Kenosha County Circuit Court on June 25 for a status hearing. Kizer was 17 when she was charged in June 2018 with first-degree intentional homicide, arson and auto theft in the death of Randall Volar III. Defense attorney Gregory Holdahl is next to her.


Mark Hertzberg, for the Kenosha News

Comments are closed.