Madison man charged with killing, sexual assault of toddler ordered to stand trial | Crime

Lucas Robinson | Wisconsin State Journal

A Madison man who allegedly terrorized a Southwest Side family before killing and sexually assaulting a toddler was ordered to stand trial after a preliminary hearing on Wednesday.

A criminal complaint alleges Marshawn D. Giles, 23, beat, pointed guns and threatened to kill a woman and her children throughout April, a pattern of events prosecutors say culminated with Giles’ April 25 arrest after he threw a 20-month-old girl across a bathroom, causing multiple skull fractures that killed her.

On Wednesday, a Madison police detective tested about Giles’ alleged abuse of another child in the Schroeder Road home.

On April 18, Giles allegedly hit a 7-year-old boy and flicked him in the eye, said Detective Glenn Davis.

After Davis’ testimony, Dane County Judge David Conway found that there was probable cause that Giles had committed felony child abuse and ordered him to stand trial.

While Giles faces a slew of other charges, including first-degree intentional homicide and first-degree sexual assault of a child, Conway ruled that the charges were all related to each other and that prosecutors only had to provide evidence for probable cause on the child abuse charge.

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Giles’ attorney, Michael Covey, objected, arguing that prosecutors were trying to send Giles to trial on “a single count of alleged child abuse against a child that’s not involved in any of the more serious counts at all.”



Giles


DANE COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE

All told, Giles faces charges of first-degree intentional homicide and first-degree sexual assault of a child, and one count each of child abuse, criminal damage to property, second-degree reckless endangerment, second-degree sexual assault and substantial battery; two counts of felon in possession of a firearm; four counts of disorderly conduct; and five counts of misdemeanor battery.

Giles moved in to the woman’s home on the 5600 block of Schroeder Road in early March and became increasingly controlling and abusive “over me and my children,” the woman told police, according to a criminal complaint.

Over the course of April 13, 14, 18, 22 and 23, Giles allegedly strangled her, pointed a gun at her and told her, “Do you want me to kill you?” and “I’ll kill you now.”

One incident was sparked, she told police, by Giles not wanting her children to go to school.

Disputes over her children going to school led to other incidents on April 22 and 23, the woman told police. She said he “flipped out” and smashed her work computer and hit her, then gave her a gun and told her she “needs to go kill” herself. After she locked herself in a bathroom, he broke in and beat her, she said.

On April 25, after a trip to Milwaukee, Giles again beat and sexually assaulted her. On Wednesday, prosecutors detailed how Giles then threw the 20-month-old into a bathtub then a toilet multiples times.

When the mother fled the scene to alert authorities, she was naked because Giles had ordered the family to strip off their clothes, said Assistant District Attorney Tracy McMiller.

Giles pleaded not guilty at his arraignment following the preliminary hearing on Wednesday. He is being held at the Dane County Jail on a $1 million bail.

Photos: Remembering horrific van crash that killed 7 young people in 1999

Crash press conference

Wisconsin State Patrol Sgt. Bradford Altman addresses a news conference March 25, 1999, about the early morning fatal accident near Janesville.


SARAH TEWS, STATE JOURNAL

Man, company charged in crash

Choan Lane waits as his signature bond is prepared following his initial appearance April 17, 2000, at the Rock County Courthouse in Janesville. Lane and his subscription sales company, YES, were charged in connection with a van crash that killed seven people.


CRAIG SCHREINER, STATE JOURNAL ARCHIVES

Holmes appears in court

Jeremy Holmes, right, and public defender John Bergstrom appear March 26, 1999, in Rock County Circuit Court, where Holmes was facing 14 charges stemming from a fatal van crash. Holmes, 20, was charged with seven counts of negligent vehicular homicide and five counts of causing great bodily harm.


JOHN MANIACI, STATE JOURNAL ARCHIVES

State Journal front page March 26, 1999

State Journal coverage March 26, 1999

State Journal front page March 27, 1999

Holmes sentenced in deadly crash

Jeremy Holmes composes himself at the end of his sentencing hearing June 11, 1999, in Rock County Circuit Court, on charges related to a deadly van crash that killed seven young people. His attorney takes his hand to lead him from the courtroom. Holmes was sentenced to seven years in prison and four years of probation.


SARAH TEWS, STATE JOURNAL ARCHIVES

Holmes family at sentencing

The Holmes family listens to testimony June 11, 1999, during the sentencing of their son and brother, Jeremy Holmes. His father, Danny Holmes, is at the far left; sister Jenny Holmes is in the center; and Jeremy’s mother, Shelly Martin, is second from the right.


SARAH TEWS, STATE JOURNAL ARCHIVES

Sentencing hearing

Jaime McFaul, sister of crash victim Peter Christman, reacts as people speak in defense of driver Jeremy Holmes and ask that he receive leniency at a hearing June 11, 1999.


SARAH TEWS, STATE JOURNAL ARCHIVES

Statement during sentencing

DeAnna Roberts, mother of crash victim Marshall Roberts, pauses in her statement to the court during the sentencing hearing June 11, 1999, for Jeremy Holmes.


SARAH TEWS, STATE JOURNAL ARCHIVES

Waiting for the hearing to start

Monica Forgues, 16, of Madison, was paralyzed after a van crash that killed seven people. She sits in court May 17, 2000, waiting for the start of the preliminary hearing for Choan Lane, one of the owners of the company involved with the crash.


STEVE APPS, STATE JOURNAL ARCHIVES

Lane awaits sentencing

Choan Lane waits for his sentence to be handed down in Rock Couty Circuit Court in Janesville on Oct. 24, 2000.


JOHN MANIACI, STATE JOURNAL ARCHIVES

Mother comforted during hearing

Deanna Roberts is comforted Oct. 24, 2000, by husband Albert in Rock County Circuit Court in Janesville, where Choan Lane, 32, was sentenced to three years and seven months on four charges stemming from a 1999 van crash that killed members of Lane’s magazine sales crew. Roberts lost her son, Marshall, who was 16, in the crash.


JOHN MANIACI, STATE JOURNAL ARCHIVES

Testimony at sentencing hearing

Monica Forgues is wheeled to the witness stand past Choan Lane, right, and his attorney, Gerald Boyle, to offer testimony during Lane’s sentencing hearing Oct. 24, 2000, in Rock County Circuit Court in Janesville. While selling magazines for Lane, Forgues was paralyzed in a van crash that killed several of her co-workers.


JOHN MANIACI, STATE JOURNAL ARCHIVES

Lane sentenced in fatal van crash

Choan Lane, 32, sheds a tear during his sentencing in Rock County Circuit Court in Janesville on Oct. 24, 2000. Lane was sentenced three years and seven months on four charges stemming from a van crash that killed members of his magazine sales crew.


JOHN MANIACI, STATE JOURNAL ARCHIVES

Some relief at sentencing

Nancy Ashton, left, and Bonita Lettman are relieved as Choan Lane received the maximum allowable sentence in Rock County Circuit Court in Janesville on Oct. 24, 2000, for a fatal crash that killed seven people. Ashton’s daughter, Monica Forgues, was paralyzed from the neck down in the crash.


JOHN MANIACI, STATE JOURNAL ARCHIVES

Phil Ellenbecker with portrait of Malinda

Phil Ellenbecker sits beside his living room shrine for his daughter, Malinda Turvey, on March 23, 2001, nearly two years after she was killed in Janesville when a van crashed while carrying the magazine sales crew she had joined in 1999.


JOHN MANIACI, STATE JOURNAL ARCHIVES

Crash victim earns GED diploma

Monica Forgues, center, makes her way into the auditorium to receive her GED diploma on June 13, 2003, from Omega School, as her family and friends follow behind her. Walking behind Monica is her mother, Nancy Ashton. Monica was paralyzed four years earlier in a van crash in which seven people died.


MICHELLE STOCKER, THE CAPITAL TIMES ARCHIVES

Ellenbecker advocates legislation

Phil Ellenbecker of Verona holds a photo of his daughter, Malinda Turvey, after testing March 8, 2004, at the state Capitol to push for increased regulation of businesses that employ traveling sales crews. Malinda, 15 years old in the photo, was killed in a 1999 crash while working on such a crew.


LEAH L. JONES, STATE JOURNAL ARCHIVES

Settlement reached in law suit

Nancy Ashton, right, assists her daughter, Monica Forgues, during a news conference Oct. 20, 2004, announcing that a $1.85 million settlement had been reached in a van crash in 1999 that killed seven people and paralyzed Forgues.


JOSEPH W. JACKSON III, STATE JOURNAL ARCHIVES

Amber Lettman

Victim of a deadly van crash carrying a door-to-door magazine sales crew March 25, 1999, on Interstate 39-90 near Janesville.

Crystal McDaniel

Victim of a deadly van crash carrying a door-to-door magazine sales crew March 25, 1999, on Interstate 39-90 near Janesville.

Malinda Turvey

Victim of a deadly van crash carrying a door-to-door magazine sales crew March 25, 1999, on Interstate 39-90 near Janesville.

Joseph Wild

Victim of a deadly van crash carrying a door-to-door magazine sales crew March 25, 1999, on Interstate 39-90 near Janesville.

Marshal Lee Roberts

Victim of a deadly van crash carrying a door-to-door magazine sales crew March 25, 1999, on Interstate 39-90 near Janesville.

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