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City of Racine proposes fifth neighborhood TID | Local News

RACINE — The city intends to propose a new TID (Tax Incremental District) for the southwestern portion of the city.

The Planning, Heritage, and Design Committee will hold a public hearing on Sept. 7 to discuss moving forward with TID No. 31

There are several different types of TIDs. The public is probably most familiar with TIDs that support new development, such as the recent TID 29 providing incentives for the expansion of Summit Packaging and the massive TIDs Mount Pleasant set up with the intent of facilitating the Foxconn development.

Alternatively, TID 31 is a neighborhood TID, proposed for the purpose of rehabilitation or conservation. It is an urban renewal project that seeks to prevent the development of slums and blighted neighborhoods.

If approved, TID 31 would be the city’s fifth neighborhood TID. Its boundaries would abut the city’s western boundary on Perry Avenue immediately west of the Westgate Shopping Center, where Shopko formerly had been located.

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The project anticipates $11.62 million in funding for residential homeowner repair, renovations and incentives to support homeownership over the course of 20 years. Additionally, there will be just under $4 million for infrastructure projects, such as improvements to sidewalks, gutters, pavement resurfacing, accessibility upgrades, etc.



TID No. 31 would be in the southwestern portion of the city. The south border extends from Victory Avenue to 17th Street, the northern border extends from Washington Avenue to Lindemann Avenue, the eastern border includes Flett Avenue to Grove Avenue, and the western boarder extends past Perry Avenue.

TIDs

TIDs gather money through two steps:

The city sets a base value when the TID is created that is approximate to the property taxes generated that year from within the TID.

As property values ​​increase, the difference between the base value and increased value will be set aside to be used for residential projects within the district.

Critics of neighborhood TIDs often argue the money that should go to the city’s general fund, or to the other taxing districts such as Gateway and RUSD, are being spent on private residences rather than on the needs of the municipality, such as public safety.

Supporters of neighborhood TIDs tend to argue that investment in struggling neighborhoods increases the tax base. If action is not taken, struggling neighborhoods will deteriorate, the tax base will shrink due to too many blighted neighborhoods, and that has the potential to negatively impact the municipality long term.

The city assessor’s office rates property conditions using a scale range from excellent to very poor condition.

In the proposed TID, 57.65% of the properties are rated to be in average or worse condition.

To be successful, neighborhood TIDs must have a mix of properties.

If all the properties are in poor condition, the neighborhoods will not generate increased property value to support the goals of the TID, and will continue to deteriorate.

The TID study was prepared by EHLERS Public Finance Advisors, and the documents are available on the Community Development Committee website: bit.ly/3AyX7xy

In photos: Racine, Caledonia, South Shore firefighters begin building Habitat for Humanity home

Father and son

Father and son

One of the Caledonia firefighters brought his son to volunteer and get some experience. This is Seth and Henry Felker. Henry is 11 years old.


Dee Holzel


Chief at work

Chief at work

At right, Caledonia Fire Chief Jeff Henningfeld lends a hand.


Dee Holzel


Adrian Brooks

Adrian Brooks

Adrian Brooks, center, is the construction site supervisor and the only paid staff on the site.


Dee Holzel


Kevin Carton

Kevin Carton

Kevin Carton is a recent graduate of Gateway Technical College and is getting his practical experience with Habitat for Humanity through AmeriCorps.


Dee Holzel


Jeff Buenger

Jeff Buenger

Jeff Buenger, father of Racine Habitat for Humanity Executive Director Grant Buenger, is a retired Caledonia firefighter.


Dee Holzel


Racine Fire Department Volunteers

Racine Fire Department Volunteers

Racine and Caledonia firefighters, along with 11-year-old volunteer Henry Felker, pose for a photo with the frame of the Habitat for Humanity home they helped erect and a Racine Fire Department fire engine.


Courtesy of Scott Pederson

A young volunteer

A young volunteer


Courtesy of Scott Pederson

Firefighters collaborate for Habitat for Humanity

Firefighters collaborate for Habitat for Humanity

Caledonia firefighters volunteer to build a new home.


Dee Holzel


Firefighters collaborate for Habitat for Humanity

Firefighters collaborate for Habitat for Humanity

Caledonia firefighters volunteer to build a new home.


DEE HOLZEL,

Firefighters collaborate for Habitat for Humanity

Firefighters collaborate for Habitat for Humanity

Caledonia firefighters volunteer to build a new home.


DEE HOLZEL,

Firefighters collaborate for Habitat for Humanity

Firefighters collaborate for Habitat for Humanity


DEE HOLZEL,

Firefighters collaborate for Habitat for Humanity

Firefighters collaborate for Habitat for Humanity

Caledonia firefighters volunteer to build a new home.


DEE HOLZEL,

Firefighters collaborate for Habitat for Humanity

Firefighters collaborate for Habitat for Humanity


Submitted

Firefighters collaborate for Habitat for Humanity

Firefighters collaborate for Habitat for Humanity

Caledonia firefighters volunteer to build a new home.


Submitted

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