Kenosha News Editorial: A tale of two cities — One grieving, another healing | Editorial

With the announcement of the Rittenhouse verdict last week, whether they approved it or not, most Kenoshan people were keen to steer the national limelight out of our city. And while there are certainly problems following the verdict, the Kenoshan are more than willing to move on to a more solid pattern of normalcy.

Just two days later, the spotlight shifted, but not in the way we’d ever imagined or wished for. Our regional neighbors in Waukesha experienced a terrible tragedy late Sunday afternoon when an SUV plowed through the town’s Christmas parade.

Our thoughts and prayers go with those who have suffered loss or are recovering from injury in connection with this pointless incident. We also thank the first responders and passers-by who rushed to help the wounded and the police who worked in a short time to protect the crowd, help the injured, control frightened and shocked bystanders and then go full blast to locate the perpetrator and investigate the incident.

Thanks also to the Waukesha School District for making the quick decision to close schools on Monday and provide counseling to those in need of help following the tragedy. Mental health professionals and clergymen will no doubt also be called in in the coming days, weeks and months to provide therapy and advice to the dozen of people who witnessed the horror on Sunday.

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The incident at the start of the holiday season is particularly numbing and heartbreaking. And the fact that it came after the ward was gathering for a family event that the local kids were excited to see is heartbreaking and deeply touching the fabric of America.

While many Waukesha families and those with close ties to the community will no doubt have trouble finding something to be thankful for this Thanksgiving, we hope all of our readers will take a moment to pause and really think about what they have lived in their life and reflect on and appreciate those who love them.

In Kenosha, after the Rittenhouse trial, we are grateful that there was no violent reaction to the pronouncement of the verdict last weekend.

While we know that there are still many problems to be pondered, debated, corrected and tried to find ground, the best way to do this is through dialogue, lobbying our leaders and when the people are up for it deem necessary to protest peacefully. This is how our democracy should work.

But now it’s time to heal, here in Kenosha and especially now in Waukesha.

A person taken into custody after an SUV plowed into a Wisconsin Christmas parade killing at least five people was identified as 39-year-old Darrell Brooks.

Today in History: November 23rd

1903: Enrico Caruso

In 1903 Enrico Caruso made his American debut at the Metropolitan Opera House in New York, where he could be seen in “Rigoletto”.


A&E

1963: Lyndon B. Johnson

1963: Lyndon B. Johnson

In 1963, President Lyndon B. Johnson proclaimed November 25 the day of national mourning following the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.


AP

1971: China

1971: China

In 1971 the People’s Republic of China was a member of the UN Security Council.


AP

1980: earthquake

1980: earthquake

In 1980, around 2,600 people were killed in a series of earthquakes that devastated southern Italy.


AP

2000: recount

2000: recount

In 2000, in a setback for Al Gore, the Florida Supreme Court refused to order Miami-Dade County officials to resume hand-counting ballots on election day. Meanwhile, Gore’s attorneys argued in a brief filed with the US Supreme Court that the Supreme Court should stay out of the Florida election controversy.


AP

2003: Afghanistan

2003: Afghanistan

In 2003, five US soldiers were killed in a helicopter crash in Afghanistan.


AP

2003: Eduard Shevardnadze

2003: Eduard Shevardnadze

In 2003 Eduard Shevardnadze resigned as President of Georgia in the face of protests.


AP

2006: Alexander Litvinenko

2006: Alexander Litvinenko

In 2006, ex-KGB spy Alexander Litvinenko died of radiation poisoning in London after making a deathbed statement accusing Russian President Vladimir Putin.


AP

2008: Citigroup

2008: Citigroup

In 2008, the government unveiled a bold plan to rescue Citigroup by injecting a new $ 20 billion into the troubled company and guaranteeing hundreds of billions of dollars in risky assets.


AP

2011: Ali Abdullah Saleh

2011: Ali Abdullah Saleh

Ten years ago: Yemen’s authoritarian President Ali Abdullah Saleh agreed to resign, only to overthrow him in a violent uprising after 33 years in power.


Yemen state television through APTN

2016: Ralph Branca

2016: Ralph Branca

Five years ago: Ralph Branca, the Brooklyn Dodgers pitcher who gave up Bobby Thomson’s famous Shot Heard ‘Round the World in 1951, died at the age of 90 in Rye Brook, New York.


AP

2016: Donald Trump

2016: Donald Trump

Five years ago: President-elect Donald Trump selected two Republican women who had unflattering things to say about him during the election campaign: South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley to serve as U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, and Betsy DeVos, Charter School attorney to lead the Department of Education.


AP

2020: David Dinkins

2020: David Dinkins

One year ago: David Dinkins, who became the first black mayor of New York City in 1990, died at the age of 93.


AP

2020: Joe Biden

2020: Joe Biden

A year ago: The federal government recognized Joe Biden as the “apparent winner” of the November 3rd elections and thus officially initiated the change of power; President Donald Trump still refused to give in and vowed to continue a lawsuit after General Services Administrator Emily Murphy gave the go-ahead for Biden to coordinate with federal agencies prior to his inauguration. Michigan confirmed Biden’s victory in the battlefield state.


AP

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